Recently Added Videos

Sir David Attenborough visits Malaysia to take a closer look at the life of the world’s largest honey bees. When one sting can lead to a thousand very quickly in a very defensive colony of killer bees, Sir David is quite keen to make a good impression!. Amazing video from BBC animal and wildlife show ‘Life in the Undergrowth’.

Let PBS know more about you and what digital series you’d like to see: http://surveymonkey.com/r/pbsds2016
Tweet this ⇒ http://bit.ly/OKTBShunE Share on FB ⇒ http://bit.ly/OKTBShunEfb
↓ More info and sources below ↓

Check out our BEE PLAYLIST! http://bit.ly/OKTBSbeelist

The Honey Bee Dance Language Explained: https://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/apiculture/pdfs/1.11%20copy.pdf

Being a queen is about more than royal jelly:
Mao, Wenfu, Mary A. Schuler, and May R. Berenbaum. “A dietary phytochemical alters caste-associated gene expression in honey bees.”Science advances 1.7 (2015): e1500795

Multiple phenotypes coming from the same genetics (like workers and queens) is called “polyphenism”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphenism

The social structure of honeybee hives: https://hymenoptera42.wordpress.com/2013/02/15/the-social-structure-of-honey-bees/

The following clips were used under Creative Commons CC-BY license:
Mary Ann Aschenbrennerhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VG6tWrcy3mQ
BeesOnTheNet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEMg_F1yUJk

Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment or check us out at the links below!
Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/okaytobesmart
http://twitter.com/jtotheizzoe
Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com
Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe
Follow on Snapchat: YoDrJoe

—————–
It’s Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D.
Follow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe
Email me: itsokaytobesmart AT gmail DOT com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart
For more awesome science, check out: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com
Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigita…

Music via APM
Stock images from Shutterstock, stock footage from Videoblocks (unless otherwise noted)

http://www.youtube.com/user/backyardbugs
Honey bees are social insects in the family Apidae, order Hymenoptera. The most important species to humans is Apis millifera, the honey bee. Honey bees live in colonies or bee hives. Bees have two pairs of wings and compound eyes. Beekeepers make hives for the bees out of straw, pottery, or wooden boxes. Wild bees make their hives in hollow trees or logs or sometimes under the eaves of houses. Worker bees stand guard at the entrance of the hive, keeping out bees from other hives. Honey bees protect their hive by stinging intruders. Bees communicate with each other with pheromones. Pheromones are body chemicals that allow bees and other animals to talk to each other by smell. Bees smell pheromones and other scents with their antennae and can tell whether a bee is from the same hive, a worker, a queen bee, or is warning about danger. Bees can fight most honey robbers like skunks, bears, and wasps who come to raid the hive. When a honey bee stings, the barbs on the stinger get stuck in the victim, and the stinger is pulled out of the bee’s body. The bee dies shortly after stinging. Queen bees however can sting many times and can pull their stinger out of the victim’s skin. The honeycombs inside the hive are made up of small boxes called cells. The cells are six-sided or hexagons. They are tilted so that the honey does not flow out. All the cells together make up the comb. The comb is made from wax that bees make with their wax glands. The wax comes out from openings on the underside of the bee’s abdomen. Bees forage thousands of flowers a day to gather nectar and pollen. Nectar and pollen are food for bees. Pollen is sometimes called bee bread. Nectar is a sweet liquid found inside flowers. The bee laps and sucks up nectar with her tube-like tongue and stores it in her honey stomach. The female worker bees make honey from nectar in the bee hive. Bees eat this honey in the winter when there is no food available from flowers. It takes more than 5,000 flower visits to make one teaspoon of honey. Honey bees also gather pollen grains from each flower they visit. The bee uses her hind legs to scrape off the pollen grains stuck to its abdomen and then presses them into the pollen basket on the hind leg. While gathering pollen, the honey bee also pollinates flowers as she accidentally carries pollen from flower to flower. When a pollen grain combines with a flower egg cell inside the flower, a seed begins to grow. Bees pollinate many crop plants—plants that give us food like oranges, apples and watermelons. Find science explorations and other good stuff for kids, parents, and teachers here: http://totallybuggin.com/ and here https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Backyard-Bugs/512628555476588 Copyright 2013 KinderMagic.com

Read Book PDF Online Here http://goodreadslist.com.playsterbooks.com/?book=1519769709

PDF How to Raise Backyard Honey Bees: The Complete Guide to Beekeeping from Setting up Your

Download Now http://worthbooks.xyz/?book=1907030115

Read Creating Your Backyard Farm: How to Grow Fruit and Vegetables and Raise Chickens and Bees

Subscribe to our new Food Farmer Earth channel on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/user/foodfarmerearth?sub_confirmation=1

For more videos, and information on bees, visit cookingupastory.com In part 2 of this how to series with veteran beekeeper Glen Andresen, we learn about the basic equipment needed for those relatively new to beekeeping, or just starting out.

Cooking Up a Story-Bringing the people behind our food to life
http://cookingupastory.com

Cooking Up a Story channel on YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/cookingupastory
Subscribe to Cooking Up a Story-receive the latest videos
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=cookingupastory
Daily Email Subscriptions
http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=CookingUpAStory
RSS Feed
http://feeds.feedburner.com/CookingUpAStory
Cooking Up a Story twitter
http://twitter.com/cookingupastory
Cooking Up a Story- Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Cooking-Up-A-Story/6256669037

Food.Farmer.Earth- a journey of wide discovery about our food
http://www.youtube.com/ffe

Subscribe to Food.Farmer.Earth-receive the latest videos
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=foodfarmerearth
Food.Farmer.Earth follow us on twitter
http://twitter.com/foodfarmerearth
Food.Farmer.Earth join us on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/foodfarmerearth

Part 1 – In this video we prepare our bee hive for removal of the honey. The crown board must be placed below the supers with Porter Bee Escapes. These escapes allow the bees to leave the supers and enter the brood box, but not go back up into the supers. If these are successful the supers will be free of bees and can be taken away to harvest the honey. The hive has not been opened for over 2 years and we have a very active colony. The last time I opened up the hive the bees were very aggressive.

I’ve documented my experiences learning how to raise honeybees, harvesting honey, building beehives, and more. I call it Beekeeping 101 or Beginning …

Have you always wanted to keep bees? Thanks to YouTube anyone can learn how to become a beekeeper. Today Wranglerstar will install a Queen and package of bees into his Top Bar Beehive.

Ever thought about keeping bees? Bees are great garden helpers that will improve yields of gardens and orchards, and as a bonus, they’ll pay you back with sweet honey! In this video, Tricia goes over the process of starting and setting up the hive.

Buy Bee Supplies: http://www.groworganic.com/homestead/beekeeping.html

Watch More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/groworganic