[BEEKEEPING] Videos

A beekeepers review of a homemade heavy duty four frame electric honey extror. Visit if you need good quality extrors. \r
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This beekeeping 101 video looks at a DIY homemade four frame honey extror that can accommodate any honey frame sizes. From ideal honey frames to full depth frames. It has a built in speed controller, and is mostly made out of washing machine parts. It is belt driven, has a large food grade bucket with a standard beekeepers honey gate at the bottom of the extring barrel. The stand is very heavy duty, and holds up very well even if the honey frames are uneven in size or weight. Extring honey can be difficult without a fully automated and motorized honey extror, and we found this one in a garage sale for a couple of hundred dollars. We did not build this extror, but if you have, and are watching our videos, let us know and we will be happy to mention your name or link to you beekeeping website. \r
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Hope you enjoy this short video. We will follow up with another video so you can see this four frame stainless steel motorized homemade beekeepers honey extror in ion, or also often referred to as a honey frame spinner.\r
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Thanks for visiting our Beekeeping 101 video channel, and we invite you to subscribe and share our content to show your support.\r
MahakoBees\r
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Music composed, performed and provided by Groovey – Adam Kubát a Pavel Křivák. You can visit their website on:

We have everything you need at Barnyard bees for your beekeeping supplies.
Store# (706)971-2700

Like the old saying goes when life gives you lemons make lemonade, but in this case when beekeeping gives you lemons make lemonade. There’s always a good solution to any kind of problem, sometimes it just takes experience, sometimes it takes teachers to show you, Please share these videos I’m willing to share all information we have learned over the years.

Uncapping, Extring and filtering honey, as well as the honeybees cleaning out the excess honey left in the supers.

Beekeeping enthusiasts,\r
Our new video shows a closeup step by step instructional how to for young beekeepers where we show the beeswax decapping process we follow to clean the frames, remove the cappings, and prepare the frame for extrion in a centrifugal frame extror.\r
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There are many ways beekeepers choose to remove the cappings from their honey frames. None of them can be considered the best or the ultimate, nor can any other methods be considered flawed. It is a very individual matter. Some hobby beekeepers use a hot know, some a steam knife, others use only the decapping fork or a simple kitchen serrated knife. And those beekeepers operating in larger beekeeping farms and apiaries with 20 or more hives tend to have automated machines that have spinning rotary blades or spikes that as the frames pass through, remove the top beeswax cappings. Some things to consider when starting out, is the volume of frames you are going to be processing. That will definitely have an imp on how you choose to remove the cappings. Other considerations may include your opinion and thoughts on say a hot gun may have on the quality of honey you produce. Another consideration is what to do with the cappings? Do you want beeswax? The work it takes to clean it, melt it, filter it and process it? Many dont want the hassle and opt to scratch the cappings or use the heat gun. \r
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As you get more familiar with your beehive and the honey frames you extr, you will find that the bees also produce varying shapes on the honey frame, and that too can be a problem and may alter your choice of beeswax decapping process you choose to try or adopt. In this video, we had a perfect frame, where the cappings were built outward by the bees and the cappings were ABOVE the ual timber frame. This makes it perfect for use of a hot knife, as the knife can be rested on the frames and simply slice off the wax cappings. Many frames however are not that way and the bees build them just below the full depth or height of the timber frames. In this scenario, a hot knife can do very little, and the only way to get the cappings off is to either scratch them or pull them off bit by bot using the decapping fork. This often leads to another debate we will cover in one of our future videos – should you use 10 frames or 9 frames in a full deep honey super? What are your thoughts? Leave us a comment below. Will the honey yield be higher or lower? Or the same? Will the hot knife cut through a much thicker overhang of honey comb? Will the running honey cool it too quickly slowing the whole process down? We are keen to hear your thoughts. \r
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So as you can see, you will need to equip yourself with tools and skills to use them to accommodate several scenarios, each requiring a different method. Each honey frame will be different and may require use of two to three different styles even within the single honey frame. \r
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We hope you enjoy our videos, and if you do, please click the SUBSCRIBE button. It helps us keep growing this channel and assist the much needed and very sparse new and young beekeepers. Hit the LIKE button and share.\r
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We thank you for your support and hope you visit us again for our next video, where we will examine the use of a heat gun. Is this the method for you? Many say it is fantastically easy, fast and more efficient! We are keen to learn your thoughts on the matter after seeing our brief study.\r
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Have an enjoyable day.\r
MahakoBees\r
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Music composed, performed and provided by Groovey – Adam Kubát a Pavel Křivák\r
You can visit their website on:

Natural Beekeeping | Intro to Catching Wild Swarms (Vlog)

Store# (706)971-2700
Here is a fine example of what will happen if you don’t ventilate your hive we had put these here temporarily for a few days without ventilation and moisture accumulated on the lid from the bees clustering from the cold night. luckily the cold snap was short-lived and it did not harm the bees ,but in most cases the moisture will drip down on the honey bees and kill them, this can be a big beekeeping mistake.

Occurred on April 12, 2017 / Northern Cyrus

Info from Licensor: “In 1993, Mersin Erdelmli hired two beekeepers to get to know about this trade. It took me a long time to learn this from him and soon I became a bee dealer but I did not go professionally, as this hobby has always given me very good feelings. The benefits that nature provides is amazing and shows that the bees are doing their tasks perfectly.”