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60,000 Bees Provide Local Restaurant Ingredients – as part of the news series by GeoBeats.

Recently honored as a Certified Green Restaurant, Table 45 at the InterContinental Hotel Cleveland is helping to replenish the honey bee population.

According to the USDA, “The total number of managed honey bee colonies has decreased from 5 million in the 1940s to only 2.5 million today.” To help in that cause, a beehive has been created on the fifth floor rooftop of the hotel that will house 60,000 bees and produce 35 pounds of honey annually.

“We are choosing to take a leadership position with our sustainability initiatives at the InterContinental Cleveland,” says general manager Campbell Black. The honey harvested will be utilized in food and drinks at the hotel and plans also include bottling the honey to sell to hotel guests.

It will take approximately one year for the hive to begin producing the nectar, but in celebration of the event, Table 45 will be serving up some special cocktails that include the O-Honey, Swinging at Bees and the Bee Happy.

The Greater Cleveland Beekeepers Association will be assisting the hotel staff with maintaining the hive and keeping the bees healthy.

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[Read] The international bee crisis is threatening our global food supply, but this user-friendly field guide shows what you can do to help protect our pollinators. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation offers browsable profiles of 100 common flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that support bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds. The recommendations are simple: pick the right plants for pollinators, protect them from pesticides, and provide abundant blooms throughout the growing season by mixing perennials with herbs and annuals! 100 Plants to Feed the Bees will empower homeowners, landscapers, apartment dwellers ? anyone with a scrap of yard or a window box ? to protect our pollinators. For Trial

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The international bee crisis is threatening our global food supply, but this user-friendly field guide shows what you can do to help protect our pollinators. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation offers browsable profiles of 100 common flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that attract bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds. The recommendations are simple: sow seeds for some plants ? such as basil, rhododendron, and blueberries ? and simply don?t mow down abundant native species, including aster, goldenrod, and milkweed. 100 Plants to Save the Bees will empower homeowners, landscapers, apartment dwellers ? anyone with a scrap of yard or a window box ? to protect our pollinators.

The Western Honey Bee was brought to the United States a long time ago because — true to its name — it makes a lot of honey. But it is also a great pollinator. Like cattle, they are bred by the millions and shipped around the country to pollinate everything from almonds to broccoli. But all that hard work and stress is literally killing the bees. To help fight the problem, concerned citizens are raising honeybees everywhere they can, including inside city limits. Treva Thrush reports.
Originally published at – http://www.voanews.com/media/video/cities-provide-pollination-haven-honeybees/3417126.html